What is the role of aesthetics in narrating climate change? In what ways do our conceptions of climate change cascade into our visual and built worlds? Into tourism, into the daily lives of those contributing most to GHG emissions? Is there any such thing as “sustainable” development?

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Current Writings

Renewable Reefs

Creating “useful” resource outputs from otherwise “empty” or “functionless” marine space is a defining rationale for artificial reef development. The Museo Atlantico generates dive tourism revenue from a purportedly “empty” patch of sand, traditional Japanese fishing rigs create new habitats for fish that expand the harvesting capacity along the shoreline, and landfills or coastal expansion […]

Coda

I didn’t think I’d be back to Lanzarote, ever. It was one of the few ostensibly permanent goodbyes I was willing to let myself make last year, or at all, really. Maybe that’s why it didn’t happen the way I thought it would. In the not-time of the internet and this blog, Lanzarote was my […]

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Rennie Meyers’ work sits at the nexus of coastal resilience and design. She is concerned with the social, material, and ecological consequences of how we conceive of and maintain our coastlines. Passionate about ceramics, landscapes, and the marine world, Rennie is comprehensively familiar with the policies, politics, and techniques that dictate where and how artificial reefs are installed. She is in the process of completing her Marine Affairs Master’s Degree and Thesis at University of Rhode Island after a year-long Watson fellowship ethnographically documenting artificial and restored reefs.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 8.15.18 PM “Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing was ever made.” – Immanuel Kant

Whether or not coral is “made” or “participates” is up for debate. But also because we think we build buildings straight up. Screen Shot 2014-05-11 at 8.15.26 PM

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Contact Me

Rennie is available for lectures, ethnographic field support, science writing and field photography (above or below the water).

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