Out to the Flats

Amelia and I tagged along with some Bonefishers today, and here’s a quick photojournal:

The beautiful intertidal flats!
The beautiful intertidal flats!
Mangroves, vegetated intertidal zones where juvenile fish are common, are often the first parts of an island to be torn apart by development. Highly counterintuitive given they provide a storm barrier, a carbon sink, and the PLACE WHERE FISH GET BIG AND YUMMY.
Mangroves, vegetated intertidal zones where juvenile fish are common, are often the first parts of an island to be torn apart by development. Highly counterintuitive given they provide a storm barrier, a carbon sink, and the PLACE WHERE FISH GET BIG AND YUMMY.
Out on the flats at low tide.
Out on the flats at low tide. Excuse me looking like a gnome.

As an example of the abundance and biodiversity present in Mangroves, today I saw 6 sharks, 2 sea turtles, 3 blue crabs, hundreds of juvi. fish, a school of bonefish, 4 pufferfish, and one weird white girl humming to herself as she waded in waist-high water holding her phone above her head – oh wait, sorry, that’s me. One of the sharks was a pretty hefty 4 ft Nurse Shark (I was a little nervous, but I should have remembered by mantra re: Nurse Sharks: Like regular nurses, they’ll only hurt you if you really bug them. But you really shouldn’t bug them). I played Red Light Green Light with a trio of juvenile Lemon Sharks…I am still unsure if it was a game.

A shark! Very cute.
A shark! Very cute.
A sea turtle! Very Fast.
A sea turtle! Very Fast.
mmmmmmm
mmmmmmm.

If you stand still on the rocks, you hear roots and rocks clicking. On the flats, a gentle lapping at your heels.

We head in, Bonefishermen benignly disgruntled and empty-handed. I pushed their buttons a bit after I described a school of gray fish I'd seen finning in the shallows and they were like "yo that's the fish we were trying to find."
We head in, Bonefishermen benignly disgruntled and empty-handed. I pushed their buttons a bit after I described a school of gray fish I’d seen finning in the shallows and they were like “yo that’s the fish we were trying to find.”

Back at Island School I worked on Flats Ecology research with the lovely Aaron Schultz; it was great to muddle around in those memories and then be snapped back to a truly beautiful reality.

Under the Abaco Pines and the sharp sun
Under the Abaco Pines and the sharp sun

Back to the AC and the bookwork that I really need to do please someone tell me to just freaking do it. Cheers! Rennie p.s. – There are over 2,000 hits on the site! Thank you! I love you (most likely)!

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